The Gecko’s Foot: How Scientists are Taking a Leaf from Nature’s Book

#ad
Harper Perennial #ad - It is science we will be reading about in our papers very soon; it is the science of tomorrow's world. Recently however the secret was solved by a team of scientists in Oregon who established that the mechanism really is dry, and that it does not involve suction, capillary action or anything else the lay person might imagine.

A cutting-edge science book in the style of ‘Fermat’s Last Theorem’ and ‘Chaos’ from an exciting and accessible voice in popular science writing. Bio-inspiration is a form of engineering but not in the conventional sense. Each foot has half a million bristles and each bristle ramifies into hundreds of finer spatula-shaped projections.

The fine scale of the gecko's foot is beyond the capacity of conventional microengineering, but a team of nanotechnologists have already made a good initial approximation. The gecko's foot is just one of many examples of this new 'smart' science. Extending beyond our established and preconceived notions, scientists, architects and engineers are looking at imitating nature by manufacturing 'wet' materials such as spider silk or the surface of the gecko's foot.

The Gecko's Foot: How Scientists are Taking a Leaf from Nature's Book #ad - The amazing power of the gecko's foot has long been known – it can climb a vertical glass wall and even walk upside down on the ceiling – but no ideas could be harnessed from it because its mechanism could not be seen with the power of optical microscopes. We also discover, amongst other things, how george de mestral's brush with the spiny fruits of the cocklebur inspired him to invent Velcro; how the shape of leaves opening from a bud has inspired the design of solar-powered satellites; and the parallels between cantilever bridges and the spines of large mammals such as the bison.

The new 'smart' science of bio-inspiration is going to produce a plethora of products over the next decades that will transform our lives, and force us to look at the world in a completely new way.

#ad



Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe

#ad
Ecco #ad - In dark matter and the dinosaurs, randall tells a breathtaking story that weaves together the cosmos’ history and our own, illuminating the deep relationships that are critical to our world and the astonishing beauty inherent in the most familiar things. In a sense, it might have been dark matter that killed the dinosaurs.

Working through the background and consequences of this proposal, Randall shares with us the latest findings—established and speculative—regarding the nature and role of dark matter and the origin of the Universe, and life, our Solar System, our galaxy, along with the process by which scientists explore new concepts.

In this brilliant exploration of our cosmic environment, the renowned particle physicist and New York Times bestselling author of Warped Passages and Knocking on Heaven’s Door uses her research into dark matter to illuminate the startling connections between the furthest reaches of space and life here on Earth.

Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe #ad - Sixty-six million years ago, creating a devastating cataclysm that killed off the dinosaurs, an object the size of a city descended from space to crash into Earth, along with three-quarters of the other species on the planet. What was its origin? in dark matter and the dinosaurs, Lisa Randall proposes it was a comet that was dislodged from its orbit as the Solar System passed through a disk of dark matter embedded in the Milky Way.

#ad



The Dinosaur Hunters: A True Story of Scientific Rivalry and the Discovery of the Prehistoric World Text Only Edition

#ad
Fourth Estate #ad - The story of two nineteenth-century scientists who revealed one of the most significant and exciting events in the natural history of this planet: the existence of dinosaurs. In ‘the dinosaur hunters’ deborah cadbury brilliantly recreates the remarkable story of the bitter rivalry between two men: Gideon Mantell uncovered giant bones in a Sussex quarry, became obsessed with the lost world of the reptiles and was driven to despair.

Richard owen, a brilliant anatomist, gave the extinct creatures their name and secured for himself unrivalled international acclaim. Note that it has not been possible to include the same picture content that appeared in the original print version.

#ad



Kepler's Witch: An Astronomer's Discovery of Cosmic Order Amid Religious War, Political Intrigue, and the Heresy Trial of His Mother

#ad
HarperOne #ad - James connor tells kepler's story as a pilgrimage, a spiritual journey into the modern world through war and disease and terrible injustice, a journey reflected in the evolution of Kepler's geometrical model of the cosmos into a musical model, harmony into greater harmony. The leitmotif of the witch trial adds a third dimension to Kepler's biography by setting his personal life within his own times.

Set against the backdrop of the witchcraft trial of his mother, this lively biography of Johannes Kepler – 'the Protestant Galileo' and 16th century mathematician and astronomer – reveals the surprisingly spiritual nature of the quest of early modern science. In the style of dava sobel's galileo's daughter, Connor's book brings to life the tidal forces of Reformation, Counter–Reformation, and social upheaval.

Kepler's Witch: An Astronomer's Discovery of Cosmic Order Amid Religious War, Political Intrigue, and the Heresy Trial of His Mother #ad - Johannes kepler, who discovered the three basic laws of planetary motion, was persecuted for his support of the Copernican system. After a neighbour accused his mother of witchcraft, Kepler quit his post as the Imperial mathematician to defend her. With a great respect for the history of these times and the life of this man, but also Kepler, Connor's accessible story illuminates the life of Kepler, the man of science, a man of uncommon faith and vision.

The acts of this trial, including kepler's letters and the accounts of the witnesses, although published in their original German dialects, had never before been translated into English. Echoing some of dava sobel's work for Galileo's Daughter, Connor has translated the witch trial documents into English.

#ad



The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth's Past Mass Extinctions

#ad
Ecco #ad - Using the visible clues these devastations have left behind in the fossil record, ” from South Africa to the New York Palisades, The Ends of the World takes us inside “scenes of the crime, to tell the story of each extinction. Brannen examines the fossil record—which is rife with creatures like dragonflies the size of sea gulls and guillotine-mouthed fish—and introduces us to the researchers on the front lines who, using the forensic tools of modern science, are piecing together what really happened at the crime scenes of the Earth’s biggest whodunits.

Part road trip, and part cautionary tale, part history, The Ends of the World takes us on a tour of the ways that our planet has clawed itself back from the grave, and casts our future in a completely new light. In the ends of the world, peter brannen dives into deep time, exploring Earth’s past dead ends, and in the process, offers us a glimpse of our possible future.

The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth's Past Mass Extinctions #ad - Many scientists now believe that the climate shifts of the twenty-first century have analogs in these five extinctions. One of vox’s most important books of the decadenew york times editors' choice 2017forbes top 10 best environment, frozen, smothered, climate, award-winning science journalist Peter Brannen takes us on a wild ride through the planet's five mass extinctions and, in the process, poison-gassed, and Conservation Book of 2017As new groundbreaking research suggests that climate change played a major role in the most extreme catastrophes in the planet's history, offers us a glimpse of our increasingly dangerous future Our world has ended five times: it has been broiled, and pelted by asteroids.

#ad



Scientific Discovery from the Brilliant to the Bizarre: The Doctor Who Weighed the Soul, and Other True Tales

#ad
Arcade #ad - Winner of the ignobel prize in physics and the 2004 american Institute of Physics Science Writing Award, Len Fisher showed just how much fun science can be in his enthusiastically praised debut, How to Dunk a Doughnut. He touches on topics from lightning to corsets and from alchemy to Frankenstein and water babies, but he may not claim the last word on the weight of the soul!

In this new work, he reveals that science sometimes takes a path through the ridiculous and the bizarre to discover that Nature often simply does not follow common sense. But other, light, heat, and energy, no less fanciful experiments and ideas led to the fundamentals of our understanding of movement, and such things as the discovery of electricity, and the structure of DNA; improved engines; and the invention of computers.

Scientific Discovery from the Brilliant to the Bizarre: The Doctor Who Weighed the Soul, and Other True Tales #ad - As in his previous book, as well as humor, Fisher uses personal stories and examples from everyday life, to make the science accessible. One experiment, and a dying man, involving a bed, platform scales, seemed to prove that the soul weighed the same as a slice of bread.

#ad



The Other Side of Normal: How Biology Is Providing the Clues to Unlock the Secrets of Normal and Abnormal Behavior

#ad
William Morrow #ad - Other bestselling works of neurobiology and the mind have focused on mental illness and abnormal behaviors—like the Oliver Sacks classic, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat—but The Other Side of Normal is an eye-opening, thought-provoking, utterly fascinating and totally accessible exploration of the universals of human experience.

It will change forever our understanding of who we are and what makes us that way. In this enthralling work of popular science, respected harvard psychiatrist jordan smoller addresses one of humankind’s most enduring and perplexing questions: What does it mean to be “normal?” In The Other Side of Normal, Smoller explores the biological component of normalcy, revealing the hidden side of our everyday behaviors—why we love what we love and fear what we fear.

#ad



The Tree: A Natural History of What Trees Are, How They Live, and Why They Matter

#ad
Broadway Books #ad - He explains the “memory” of a tree: how those that have been shaken by wind grow thicker and sturdier, while those attacked by pests grow smaller leaves the following year; and reveals how it is that the same trees found in the United States are also native to China but not Europe. A blend of history, philosophy, and environmentalism, science, The Tree is an engaging and elegant look at the life of the tree and what modern research tells us about their future.

There are redwoods in california that were ancient by the time Columbus first landed, and pines still alive that germinated around the time humans invented writing. Tudge takes us to the amazon in flood, when the water is deep enough to submerge the forest entirely and fish feed on fruit while river dolphins race through the canopy.

From the tallest to the smallest, new zealand, panama and brazil, colin tudge travels around the world—throughout the united States, the Costa Rican rain forest, China, trees inspire wonder in all of us, how they eat and reproduce, how they talk to one another and they do, and in The Tree, and most of Europe—bringing to life stories and facts about the trees around us: how they grow old, India, and why they came to exist in the first place.

The Tree: A Natural History of What Trees Are, How They Live, and Why They Matter #ad - There are douglas firs as tall as skyscrapers, and a banyan tree in Calcutta as big as a football field. He considers the pitfalls of being tall; the things that trees produce, from nuts and rubber to wood; and even the complicated debt that we as humans owe them. From tiny saplings to centuries-old redwoods and desert palms, from the backyards of the American heartland to the rain forests of the Amazon and the bamboo forests, Colin Tudge takes the reader on a journey through history and illuminates our ever-present but often ignored companions.

#ad



The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us About Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future

#ad
Spiegel & Grau #ad - They are found virtually everywhere and we love to watch them, listen to them, wear their feathers, keep them as pets, even converse with them. They compel us to look to the skies, both literally and metaphorically; draw us out into nature to seek their beauty; and let us experience vicariously what it is like to be weightless.

Birds have helped us in so many of our human endeavors: learning to fly, providing clothing and food, and helping us better understand the human brain and body. Worthy of a place alongside david attenborough’s documentary The Life of Birds or Graeme Gibson’s The Bedside Book of Birds . It’s one for the birds—what a wonderful book! It will give you wings.

Rita mae brown, new york times bestselling author of Rubyfruit Jungle “The Wonder of Birds provides a great and well-timed gift: a portrait of the quiet miracles around us on each day of our ordinary lives. Michael punke, #1 new york times bestselling author of The Revenant “Jim Robbins writes masterfully, with lucid prose and deep insight into the human psyche and natural world.

The Wonder of Birds: What They Tell Us About Ourselves, the World, and a Better Future #ad - Peter stark, author of Astoria. This offering will appeal to naturalists, linguists, anthropologists, and even philosophers as well as to lay readers. Library journal“in this deeply felt and well-supported argument for avians’ value to humankind, science writer Robbins hits the full trifecta for engrossing and satisfying nature writing.

Publishers weekly starred review“Using enchanting stories and rich historical references, Jim Robbins explores the role of birds on the evolution of human self-awareness. Robert F.

#ad



Genomic Messages: How the Evolving Science of Genetics Affects Our Health, Families, and Future

#ad
HarperOne #ad - Ultimately, our health, it reveals how genetic information is changing how we think about ourselves, and our future. Two leaders in the field of genetics—a bioethicist-health lawyer and an obstetrician-gynecologist geneticist—answer the most pressing questions about the application of new genetics to our universal medicine and what personalized medicine means for individual healthcare.

Breakthroughs in genetic research are changing modern medicine and pharmaceuticals. But what are these changes and how do they affect our individual care? genomic messages examines these groundbreaking changes and the questions they raise: What kind of specific medical innovation do we have to look forward to now and tomorrow? How will this “flood” of genetic messages change our lives, from how medicine is practiced to concepts of privacy, our interaction with our physicians and our healthcare system?Groundbreaking and provocative, confidentiality, Genomic Messages fuses the often conflicting worlds of medicine and law to provide information and insight that will impact the health choices of every one of us, and informed consent.

#ad



Vaccinated: Triumph, Controversy, and An Uncertain F

#ad
HarperCollins e-books #ad - Vaccinated is not a biography; hilleman's experience forms the basis for a rich and lively narrative of two hundred years of medical history, all caught up, ranging across the globe and throughout time to take in a cast of hundreds, intentionally or otherwise, in the story of vaccines. Maurice hilleman's mother died a day after he was born and his twin sister stillborn.

He made it his life's work to see that others could do the same. Born into the life of a montana chicken farmer, the pharmaceutical company, and eventually joined Merck, Hilleman ran off to the University of Chicago to become a microbiologist, to pursue his goal of eliminating childhood disease. Chief among his accomplishments are nine vaccines that practically every child gets, rendering formerly dread diseases—including often devastating ones such as mumps and rubella—practically toothless and nearly forgotten; his measles vaccine alone saves several million lives every year.

Vaccinated: Triumph, Controversy, and An Uncertain F #ad - It is an inspiring and triumphant tale, but one with a cautionary aspect, as vaccines come under assault from people blaming vaccines for autism and worse. Paul offit clearly and compellingly rebuts those arguments, and, by demonstrating how much the work of Hilleman and others has gained for humanity, shows us how much we have to lose.

As an adult, he said that he felt he had escaped an appointment with death.

#ad